Archive for Pistols

German Walther P38 Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on May 28, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgHere is the last Walther P38 semi-automatic pistol I needed for my accumulation. I wanted one made by each of the three manufacturers, Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk. This one is marked AC44 meaning it was manufactured by Walther in 1944. It also is well stamped with the E/WaA359 acceptance stamps for Walther. Now I have to find another 359 marked magazine for it and a holster. By this stage in the war the Jerries had pretty much stopped making the hard shell holsters and this would have come with a breakaway soft holster.

Mauser Red-9 Shoulder Stock

Posted in Holsters with tags , , , , , , on September 5, 2015 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_German_EmpireA little while back I picked up a Red-9 Mauser C96 (see below). I only got it because I liked the quirkiness of the setup for the wooden shoulder stock. So I immediately started looking for a wooden holster to match. Doing my research I discovered a few tell tales that would be useful for someone else looking for the same thing. In this case, the original stocks always had the tensioning screw end up at an angle 20 or 30 degrees off true. The Red-9 stocks had the squared off grain on the thumb release and this is always perpendicular to the edge of the lid. And finally these stocks were supplied without the metal loop at the hinge. If your stock has a loop then it is likely a bolo stock and post-war. It’s important to get the right holster as the wood that was removed from inside the cap was different to conform with the cocking lever setup. In the Red-9 series these were always the small ring style thumb grip.

Prussian 1916 Contract Red 9 Mauser C96

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on July 30, 2015 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_German_EmpireHere is my “Red 9” Mauser C96. Mauser manufactured this pistol from 1896 until 1937. In 1916 the Imperial German Army placed an order for 150,000 of these to be chambered in 9mm Parabellum rather than the original 7.63mm. The reason for this was that the Luger production was heavily delayed and this was seen as a stop-gap. The 9 was marked into the handle by local armourers and filled with red paint, hence its name. This was done so that users did not accidentally load it with the original 7.63 ammunition.

This particular example has the shortened 140mm barrel indicating that it was reworked for police use post-war. It doesn’t have the 1920 date however. The leather holster is the as-issued variety. The adjustable sights were removed at the time of the barrel shortening and a fixed sight applied in its place.

 

Mauser-Werke “Black Widow” P-08 Luger

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on April 18, 2014 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgHere’s someone’s group that I picked up in Ontario. The pistol is marked BYF for Mauser’s factory in Oberndorf. It was manufactured in 1942. I am liking it because it’s all matching, has the original FXO stamped magazine pair with it as well as the takedown tool in the holster. The holster is correct to the pistol, being marked to GXY and manufactured in 1942. GXY was the code for Gebr. Klinge Lederwaren-Fabrik in Offenbach.

These Lugers, with the black finish, black handgrips and black bakelite magazine bottoms were named “Black Widows” by US sellers in the 1950’s to try to pimp them up a little.

German Walther PPK Automatic Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , , on January 5, 2014 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis is a Walther PPK 7.65mm automatic pistol, manufactured in Germany by Walther in 1943 and issued as a police sidearm. The holster is marked Otto Sindel, Berlin, 1943. The two magazines are original to the pistol with matching serial numbers. The receiver and frame are marked Eagle N which indicates acceptance by the Wehrmacht post 1940 and the left hand side of the frame is marked with the Eagle and a C following, indicating police issue. This pistol was reputedly acquired in Normandy by a Lieutenant Stagg, adjutant of the Oxford Rifles, from the body of a German SS officer he had just shot. Well at least that’s the tale that came with it. However upon researching I discover that the Oxford Rifles didn’t get shipped to Europe until January 1945. This is not to say that Stagg could not have been in France in July 1944, just not as adjutant of the Oxford Rifles. This will provoke some further investigation.

Further snooping reveals a Major Kenneth Stagg, P38758, in the Oxford Rifles in 1945. He was born in 1899 which makes him 45 in 1944.

Remember Kids! Buy the item, not the story!

 

Imperial German Artillery LP08 Luger

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on December 23, 2013 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_German_EmpireThis Artillery Luger, manufactured by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) in 1917 comes complete with its holster, wooden stock and a Bing manufactured type-2 snail drum magazine (Trommel magazin 08). The condition of this set is mixed, with the main problem being that the Luger itself is mismatched. The top is stamped 10, while the receiver bottom and frame is stamped 38. This makes it a bit of a shooter rather than a collectors piece although the price was awesome enough to make me ignore this.

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P08 Luger Holster & Takedown Tool

Posted in Holsters with tags , , , on May 20, 2013 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_German_EmpireThis is a 1914 stamped Luger Holster that came with my Erfert Luger. It has the takedown tool fitted into a small pocket inside the holster flap. The holster is manufactured by D. Heinichen of Dresden.