German Hunting Association Dagger

Posted in Daggers with tags , , , on February 19, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThe Deutsche Jägerschaft or German Hunting Association was headed by Herman Göring as Reich Hunting Master. The form of these hirschfanger or hunting daggers was a traditional one and you see them dating from the late 19th Century to 1945. They vary widely in their decoration as it was up to the recipient what was placed on the hilt and blade. This one came to me a bit beaten up, missing its sheath and possibly retipped at some point. But it’s a nicely upgraded version with acorns on the handle and a crossguard in the form of deer feet.

Manufactured by Eickhorn between 1935 and 1941 based on the makers mark.

German Rbl.F.36 Gun Optic

Posted in Optics with tags , , , on February 19, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgLately I have been finding a few artillery and mortar optics. I like them because they are precision equipment and are quite tactile. The optics viewfinder on this one is a bit different as it has a calculating mechanism for tracking a target traversing the field of view. This one was manufactured by Optische Werke G.Rodenstock in München and has their eso code. It is an Rbl.F.36, which stands for Rundblickfehrnrohr 36. It was used on the Pak-36, 38 & 40 as well as smaller artillery tubes.

Arisaka Type 99 Dust Cover

Posted in Parts & Accessories with tags , , on January 7, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgOften missing, and hard to find when you want one. This is a numbered dust cover for the Arisaka Type 99 rifle. These were supplied with early series Type-99’s but deleted later on, although you will see the receivers still machined for them right to the end of the war.

Walther G41 Semi-automatic Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on December 28, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgOkay, so this is the most expensive thing I have in my collection now. It’s a 1941 manufactured Walther G41(W) semiautomatic rifle. Manufactured in two plants, this example bears the stamp AC indicating it was made in Walther’s factory at Zeller Mehlis. It wasn’t a success and less than 145,000 were built. It suffered from fouling issues and over pressuring, resulting in firing pin or piston failures. You can see the resemblance to the later G43, it’s successor.

5th Series Nagoya Type 99 Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on December 28, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThis is my second Type 99 rifle. It’s a Nagoya late series 5, which puts it late 43 to late 44. The rifle is a bolt and receiver serial match but the stock is a mismatch, although correct for the series. This rifle was produced when the Japanese had started to simplify the design, resulting in the elimination of the monopod and anti-aircraft sights. The rear band still has the mount holes for the monopod although one has never been fitted. The main reason I bought this rifle was because it has the late type canvas sling, which is terrifically hard to get hold of.

German Ball Shrapnel from the Somme

Posted in Ammunition, Missiles & Projectiles, Odds & Ends with tags , , , , , on December 10, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_German_EmpireFlag_of_the_United_KingdomShrapnel and shell fragments accounted for a large proportion of those killed and wounded in WW1. Those blown into the ether by high explosive to one side, artillery accounted for around 70% of casualties. These six balls were recovered from the Thiepval Redoubt on the Somme and are German in origin. Thiepval was a slaughterhouse on the first day of the attack and, despite early success, took a savage pounding from German counter-fire.



The Battle of Thiepval. The view looking toward Thiepval on morning of attack and showing German barrage. (IWM)

Burma Death Railway Spike

Posted in Odds & Ends with tags , , , , , , on November 18, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_ThailandFlag_of_Japan.svgFlag_of_AustraliaFlag_of_the_United_KingdomA couple of cool and evocative finds here from a contact in Thailand. These are Thai 1940 dated railway spikes from the ruined railway line that ran over 415 km from Thanbyuzayat in Burma to Ban Pong in Thailand. Many people know it only from it’s depiction in the movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai” where it crosses the Mae Klong river. I visited the site and Hellfire Pass in 2014 and I cannot believe the misery under which the slave laborers, both civilian and Allied POW, must have worked and died. A digger over there walked sections of the rail line that were never reused after the war and retrieved these spikes.