Archive for the Firearms Category

Italian Breda M37 HMG

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on May 10, 2020 by The Dude

This heavy machine gun appeared out of nowhere this last month. It’s manufactured by Breda in 1939. It all matches however the barrel has a 1938 roll date so I am assuming they dated the major parts upon manufacture and then assembled them later. It’s a dewat obviously but a nice one, with a moving bolt and a topcover that lifts to reveal the guts of the gun. A great back drop to my Carcanos!

Italian M91/38 Carcano Cavalry Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on March 14, 2020 by The Dude

Just when I thought I was done with Carcano’s I get a call from Sean, who has scavenged up this interesting little variant, the M91/38 Cavalry Carbine (Moschetto Modello Cavalleria).

Chambered in 6.5×52, and equipped with a permanently affixed long spike bayonet, it was intended for the use of horse cavalry units and fitted into a leather saddle scabbard.

Interestingly the setup with the bayonet is almost identical to the Japanese Type 44 Cavalry carbine. I expect that designers kept an eye on what each other were producing and stole ideas that appealed to them. The gun is manufactured by Terni. Interesting that the barrel is proofed 36-XIV, meaning it was manufactured in 1936, the 14th year of Mussolini’s rule.

An M91/28 Carcano Reissued by the Jerries

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on February 23, 2020 by The Dude

My friend Andrew bought this rifle only a couple of months ago. I wondered if he was drunk, since he doesn’t collect rifles that aren’t a K98. I knew, if I was patient, I’d end up owning it. And here you go! This Carcano M91/28 (Moschetto Modello Mod. 91/28) in 6.5×52 shows stock markings indicated that it was issued to the Italian Navy. Markings on the stock and receiver, including the dirty bird, plus the blued bolt, indicate it was captured by the Germans, inspected and reissued. This completes my Carcano group as I have a 91/41 Carcano here and a 91/38 here.

Man it’s great having a picker like Andrew :)

A Czech VZ-23 in German use

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on February 23, 2020 by The Dude

Here is an pretty rare rifle, the Czech VZ-23 Mauser, produced by Brno. The rifle was manufactured using a German Karabiner 98AZ base, resulting in a 550mm long barrel. The newly independent Czech arms industry only made these for a short period before moving on to the improved VZ-24. Signs of German reuse in WW2 include a stamping on the receiver under the wood-line and the blued bolt.

German WW2 Luger P-08

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on August 4, 2019 by The Dude

The Luger pistol is a prohibited firearm up here north of the border, due to its barrel length of 100mm. Because I came to Canada so late I was unable to be grandfathered into the pistol license required to own one. As a substitute I own a WW1 & WW2 “cock and click” dewat as well as the long barrelled LP-08 Artillery Luger. But I always wanted the real deal. So I went the long route of sourcing a 105mm barrel from the US and then locating a Luger up here to get re-barrelled and reclassified as restricted.

This is it, a 1937 Mauser made S/42 marked Luger P-08. It came with a spare magazine, a takedown tool marked WaA63 (correct for Mauser) and a period holster from 1937.

British SMLE Enfield No1 Mk3*

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on July 20, 2019 by The Dude

I have always had a wee hard-on for the Enfield No1 Mk3. It was the first rifle I owned as a child and I have always wanted to own one again. A friend of mine is a nut for Enfields and owns far too many. I asked him to sell me a no-issues wartime rifle to go with the No4 & No5 I already had. He came up with this one. Battle issued, made in 1941/42 by Lithgow in Australia. Sighted for high velocity MkVII ammun ition, this rifle went into New Guinea with the Australian Forces. It was returned to Lithgow in June 1945.

Italian Beretta Model 38A

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on March 16, 2019 by The Dude

This is my Beretta MAB-38A SMG, in 9mm Luger. Much like the MP34ö in production quality, this was a well regarded weapon, used by many foreign armies including the Germans and manufactured into the 50’s. This particular example is pre-war and comes with the long 40 round magazine. Funny story was that I bought the magazine from a bloke in Bulgaria, but represented as an MP38 magazine. When it arrived it was plainly not that but I didn’t send it back as I thought it likely that one day I’d have the MAB-38. Here it is! It’s an interesting weapon, notably having two triggers. The forward one fires in semi-auto, while the rear one is full automatic.

Italian paratroopers of the Folgore Division equipped with the MAB-38

Japanese Type 2 Paratrooper Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on March 16, 2019 by The Dude

This is a pretty great find for me. This rifle came from the US and is a Type 2 TERA (Teishin Rakkasan Shyoujyu) rifle. This rifle was based on the Type 99 infantry rifle but designed to be able to be broken down into two parts for stowing prior to the Paratrooper drop. These rifles are almost never found with an unground Chrysanthemum and often the front and rear sections are mismatched. In this case the rifle is all matching. Interesting because it retains the anti-aircraft sights of the Type 99.

Japanese Type 44 Cavalry Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on March 16, 2019 by The Dude

This rifle is one of 91,000 manufactured by the Japanese between 1911 and 1942. These were intended to be issued to cavalry troops so they could have a less cumbersome primary weapon with an integral bayonet. Prior to this the cavalry was forced to carry a separate Type 38, a Type 30 bayonet and a Type 32 saber. This rifle has two individual holes in the butt stock compartment to hold the two parts of the cleaning rod, indicating that this is a “first type” variation. Nagoya Arsenal marked, the mum has been ground upon surrender. This rifle was quite often found with Railway or other transportation troops.

Mauser 1940 MP-38 Machine pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on November 13, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgPatience is what you need in this hobby. And after ten years of looking, my patience is rewarded with an MP-38 Machinenpistole. Just about as nice as can be given that I am in Canada, this is an all matching Erfurter Maschinenfabrik B. Geipel GmbH (ERMA) made example dating from 1940. An old dewat, it is what we call “cock and click” in that the action can be cocked and released with a pull on the trigger. Very hard to find compared to the MP-40 that I have here. All I need to find for this now is a better sling and a slab sided early magazine as the one in it is the later MP38u40 type.

German Hi Power Pistole 640(b)

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , , , on October 17, 2018 by The Dude
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After the fall of Belgium in 1940, the FN factory was taken over by the Germans and this pistol, the Browning Hi Power P-35, was produced under occupation. This example is WaA marked 140 as is one of the magazines. That magazine also has the serif U mark. This pistol takes 9mm Parabellum ammunition like the Luger and Walther P-38.

Sauer K98 Infantry Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on August 12, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgI have one other Mauser K98’s, here. That one is from a Czech factory and is all matching except for the lower stock. I wanted one of these rifles, mid-war, German factory and no need for the word “except” when describing it. Through a friend of a friend, this one appeared. A Sauer made 1943 K98, no issues, all there, lovely.

Enfield No5 Mk 1 Jungle Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on August 12, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_KingdomAlthough I try to stick to Axis firearms, sometimes the pickings get slim. So when I slide off the true path I have to be careful because there’s a world of pain in store for my bank account if I go full retard. I have always had a sweet spot for Enfield rifles though, my first long arm centerfire was a Number 1 Mk 3. The Number 5 always held a fascination for me. Partly because of it’s late war nature and partly because when it was issued, the vast majority of them went to the Far East, a theatre I have read a lot on. This example is one of 81,329 produced by BSA. It’s fully matching, unmucked with and never got the Ishapore redo post-war.

German G43 Semiautomatic Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , , on April 23, 2018 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis is my second G/K43 Rifle. The other one I have, I rebuilt from a converted sporter. This one came to me, 100% correct from a fellow collector raising funds for his next absurd purchase. The receiver is stamped AC 44, for Carl Walther Waffenfabrik in Zella-Mehlis, Goethestr. 4.

Note the stamped dot in the butt plate, the staked screws on the underside of the action and the WaaB43 stamp on the magazine (indicating manufacture by Olympia Buromaschinenwerke AG).

Walther G41 Semi-automatic Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on December 28, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgOkay, so this is the most expensive thing I have in my collection now. It’s a 1941 manufactured Walther G41(W) semiautomatic rifle. Manufactured in two plants, this example bears the stamp AC indicating it was made in Walther’s factory at Zeller Mehlis. It wasn’t a success and less than 145,000 were built. It suffered from fouling issues and over pressuring, resulting in firing pin or piston failures. You can see the resemblance to the later G43, it’s successor.

C96 M30 Broomhandle Mauser

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on June 29, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgFlag_of_the_Republic_of_ChinaThis is a M30 variant of the Mauser C96 semi-automatic pistol in 7.3mm calibre. The serial number of this example puts it around 1932. It has the three chinese characters on the magazine indicating it was for the Nationalist Chinese contract. The barrel is the standard 140mm length. Somewhere along the last 80 years it has acquired a commercial stock by Geha. Along with this one, I show below my 1920 regulation police rework with fixed sights and the short barrel. I would rate the condition of this one as tired, I have since cleaned it with a copper brush and it’s looking a lot better, but the ex-China ones are always beaters.

Japanese Type-14 Nambu Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on April 16, 2017 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThis is the Nambu Type-14 semi-automatic pistol. This pistol was produced from 1925 until 1945. This example has the digits 19.5 stamped into the frame. This is the year and month of manufacture. In this case you add 19 to 1925, the first year of the Showa Emperor. This gets you to 1944. May is the fifth month so the pistol was produced in May 1944. The manufacturer is Toriimatsu and this pistol is from the second series. 1944 was the high point in the manufacture of this pistol so the 19.5 is pretty common. These pistols a terribly ugly and have a bad reputation for shooting their owners. The ammunition, 8mm Nambu, is almost unobtainium.

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M38 Carcano Infantry Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on April 14, 2017 by The Dude
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The Fucile di Fanteria Mod. 1938. The standard short rifle adopted by the Italian Army in 1938. The rifle is in 7.35×51mm calibre. This one is a bit of a bush pig, rough, mismatched stock but cheap. It was manufactured by Terni in 1939. The 7.35 round was adopted to give the Italians a heavier hitting round than the prior 6.5 Carcano. The rifle was unusual for incorporating a detachable folding bayonet, seen below or here.

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Partisans of the Slovenian Cancarjeve Brigade in Ljubljana in May 1943. The rifles are captured Italian Carcano M38’s.

G33/40 Mountain Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on November 18, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svg800px-Flag_of_Czechoslovakia Next up on the wall is a sweet, all matching, G33/40 Mountain Carbine. These rifles were essentially a German copy of the vz33 but considerably lightened by scavenging metal from any place they could find on the rifle to remove. Note the hollow bolt. The rifle is also characterised by the plate that extends up the stock from the butt plate. This was intended to protect the rifle from damage due to being used as a walking stick. The rifle, in addition to being issued to Gebirgsjäger, was also issued to any light infantry such as the Fallschirmjäger. Known for their brutal kick and excessive flash due to the light weight and short barrel, these were only made between 1940 and 42. The 945 code here is the early code for Brno, later it changed to dot.

Arisaka Type-99 Infantry Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , on October 22, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_Japan.svgThe latest rifle in the box, a beautiful Type 99 infantry rifle in as found condition. This rifle was intended to replace the smaller caliber Type-38 found here. The 7.7mm round was found to be more effective at dropping the enemy and less likely to be deflected by light cover. This example comes with its original monopod and anti-aircraft sights as well as an intact Chrysanthemum. Brilliant! Ammunition for this can be seen here. The rifle was manufactured at the Nagoya Arsenal in mid to late 1943. It is a 4th series example and was one of the last to have the monopod fitted.

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Japanese soldier using the Type-99 during the occupation of Indochina, 1940

Italian Carcano M91/41 Rifle

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on July 1, 2016 by The Dude
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This is what happens when you start running low on German rifles to buy. You start branching out a little. I say a little because this is still a WW2 Axis weapon but I realise I am drifting to the dark side.

This rifle is a 1941 dated M91/41 long rifle (fucile) in 6.5×52 calibre, manufactured by FAT (Terni). All matching, only thrown into a ditch once! No honestly, it’s a ugly Mannlicher like rifle that doesn’t deserve its post-war reputation for poor accuracy. Most of that comes from undersized commercial rounds fed to the surplus market. This example has its original straight bolt. I have read that unscrupulous importers bent the bolts on these rifles hoping to confuse buyers into thinking they were “Italian Mausers”.

German Walther P38 Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , on May 28, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgHere is the last Walther P38 semi-automatic pistol I needed for my accumulation. I wanted one made by each of the three manufacturers, Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk. This one is marked AC44 meaning it was manufactured by Walther in 1944. It also is well stamped with the E/WaA359 acceptance stamps for Walther. Now I have to find another 359 marked magazine for it and a holster. By this stage in the war the Jerries had pretty much stopped making the hard shell holsters and this would have come with a breakaway soft holster.

Haenel MP28/II Machine-Pistol

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , on April 10, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svgThis weapon is an MP28/II machine-pistol designed by Hugo Schmeisser, based heavily on the WW1 era MP18/I. The MP28 was provided with either a 20 round box magazine or (later) a 30 round magazine. This one I picked up didn’t have a magazine with it but luckily the magazine for the Sten or Lanchester MP’s were almost identical so I’ll put a Sten mag into it until I can find an original MP28 magazine.

The MP28 was used widely between the wars and by the Waffen-SS and Polizei during WW2.

Enfield Number 4 Mark 1*

Posted in Firearms with tags , , on January 2, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_the_United_KingdomThis is a Canadian made Enfield Mark 4 Number 1*, manufactured in 1943 by The Long Branch Arsenal in Toronto, Canada. This rifle, in .303 caliber was the main battle rifle of all the British and Empire forces during most of WW2. This rifle came to me as a bit of a ruin, with a wrecked stock, although the hardware was good and the rifle was all matching. I found an unissued stock (albeit S for short) in England and married the two together along with original Canadian made breech cover and sling. The pig sticker bayonet was characteristic of the Number 4 and replaced the blade bayonet of the Number 3 rifle.

The group in the photo immediately above are men from the Canadian 48th Highlanders in Regalbuto, Sicily, 1943. The man in the white striped helmet is their Padre.

Mannlicher M1895 Carbine

Posted in Firearms with tags , , , , , , on January 2, 2016 by The Dude

Flag_of_AustriaFlag_of_the_NSDAP_(1920–1945).svg648px-Flag_of_Austria-Hungary_1869-1918This is the Mannlicher M1895 Austrian battle rifle. In this example it is the Kavaliere Repetier-Carabiner M1895 or carbine /30 in 8x56R caliber. Most likely this was cut down to stutzen length when it was converted from the 8×50 caliber in the thirties.

M95/30 was a conversion in the First Austrian Republic by Steyr-Mannlicher during 1930–1940. These rifles carry the letter S meaning Spitzer stamped on the barrel. Main modification was the rechambering to 8×56mmR cartridge. Other changes were the conversion of ladder sights from the older pace unit to meters and addition of a brass front sight protector. Many long rifles were cut down to Stutzen length. Most of M95/30s were sent to Bulgaria during 1938–40, where front sight protectors were removed.

These rifles were also used by second line units as well as the Balkan allies of Germany.